What is the Transition? Conclusion

Now you can’t say that no one ever told you.
–David Daniels

In Part 7, I promised predictions for this installment. And there will be predictions. The important question is: predictions based on what? The web and the media present piles of predictions, most of which turn out to be wrong.

So based on what? Evidence; and a model of how things work. Most predictions go awry because they aren’t based on either. Or if they are said to be based on models, the models are flawed.

Evidence is what Part 1 through Part 7 were all about. And all of us, consciously or not, operate from models of what the world is like. If we walk into a dark room and flip a light switch, we are operating from a model of the world where electricity is flowing into a building with wires connected to lights controlled by switches, and flicking a switch–that often sits precisely where we expect it to be even if we’ve never entered that room–lights one or more light bulbs. We have all sorts of such models in our heads having to do with gravity, internal combustion engines, computers, shoelaces, banks, the properties of water, etc. When correct, these models have predictive abilities that make our interactions with the world relatively easy and efficient compared to operating without such models.

So these models lead to predictions about the future, and when correct, they yield excellent results. When we turn the key in a vehicle ignition, we expect the engine to start, and typically we aren’t disappointed. Thus we made a prediction about the future, one that has generally turned out to be true. Perhaps not every time. Once in awhile, the car might not start. But the results are good enough, the model reliable enough, that we rarely “give it a second thought.”

In my view, this scales up to the major aspects of our lives. Though it does seem that, the larger the scale, the greater the disagreements people have on the topic. Yet I contend that getting large-scale models right is important and possible. When we get the large scale models wrong, life can be unnecessarily confusing and difficult; when we get them right, the results can be profound.

Bias, the bringer of difficulty

We all like to think we aren’t biased, but on this planet at this time, that is a rare achievement. It runs deeper than we like to admit. Were that not true, the mystics would not have to advise us to pierce the veil. Without bias, we would likely see that there is no veil.

Let’s look at a good example of why people have a tough time getting large scale models right. This is one where, were it a multiple-choice question on a standardized test, most highschoolers would get it right. But on this one, the “masters of Wall St” got it wrong. Big time.

Several decades ago, one researcher pointed out that the economy of the USA operates on a roughly 25 year recession/depression cycle, that is, roughly every 25 years, there is either a recession or depression. Yes, there could be recessions at other times, but you could rely on the idea that one would happen roughly every 25 years.  This cycle has been active since early in the 1800s and predicted that there would be a recession or depression starting ideally in December, 2007. I told a number of people about this ahead of time, and few thought the idea had merit despite the historical track record, part of which looked like this at the time:

9/1857: very serious recession 6/1857-12/1858 (18 months contraction)
2/1882: depression 3/1882-5/1885 (38 months contraction)
7/1906: serious recession 5/1907-6/1908 (13 months contraction)
10/1932: serious depression 8/1929-3/1933 (43 months contraction)
7/1958: recession 8/1957-4/1958 (8 months contraction)
12/1981: very serious recession 7/1981-11/1982 (16 months contraction)
12/2007:

Every August, George Soros has a meeting at his Long Island estate for the biggest movers and shakers on Wall St. By August 2007, the sub-prime mortgage market was already falling to pieces. Soros asked his 21 guests, people who have the money to buy the purportedly best research on the planet, whether the current situation would lead to a recession in the US. Twenty of twenty-one said no recession. But right on schedule for the 25 year cycle, a recession started in December 2007. Some say we are still in the depression that started then, and there is good evidence for that.

So how come people would ignore such a prescient cycle with a long and excellent track record? First, because while most people are well aware of being surrounded by cycles such as heartbeats, breathing, night and day, moon phases, ocean tides, the seasons, years, birth and death, to name just a few cycles to which we are subject, they believe that such cycles couldn’t possibly apply to an economy, that such thinking is equivalent to voodoo. Second, the researcher who was the first to publish about this cycle was Edgar Cayce, and to most hard-nosed Wall St people who think they are operating by logic and science, how could Edgar Cayce possibly be right about anything.  What they think of as hard-nosed is actually thick-skulled because Cayce was right about plenty of things. But he doesn’t fit their constrained view of “logic and science,” so out goes Cayce and anyone like him. While it would be fun to say “too bad for them,” when their firms failed in 2008, it was the rest of us who got stuck with the bill for bailing them out so they could keep their bonuses, stock options, and corporate jets.

So as we all know, in 2008 we got a humdinger (serious academic term) of a recession despite the bad models being used by the Wall St mavens and people like Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke that said we would not get a recession. So why did the masters of Wall St and most others dismiss such information? Probably because, if they heard the source of the prediction, most would discount something from Edgar Cayce because it was information channeled from the other side. And “everyone knows” that stuff is only for new age goofballs. So the real answer is: bias. People would rather hang onto their bias than admit that correct information is useful if they despise the source.

Oddly, another researcher, Manfred Zimmel of www.amanita.at, later figured out the basis for Cayce’s information. OK, check your biases. For some of you, this is about to get worse. Here’s that same recession/depression series from above exactly as I first saw it, presented by Manfred, in 2006:

Ø conjunction 9/1857: very serious recession 6/1857-12/1858 (18 months contraction)
Ø conjunction 2/1882: depression 3/1882-5/1885 (38 months contraction)
Ø conjunction 7/1906: serious recession 5/1907-6/1908 (13 months contraction)
Ø conjunction 10/1932: serious depression 8/1929-3/1933 (43 months contraction)
Ø conjunction 7/1958: recession 8/1957-4/1958 (8 months contraction)
Ø conjunction 12/1981: very serious recession 7/1981-11/1982 (16 months contraction) – last deep recession
Ø conjunction 12/2007:

Yep, you guessed it (heh), the cycle is actually the Jupiter-Pluto conjunction cycle. So an astrological model has reared it head! Yikes, so if the Wall Streeters had heeded either the channeled or the astrological model for this cycle, they could have saved their firms tens of billions in losses and turned 2008 into a year of tens of billions in profits by aligning their trading with the idea that a recession was very likely. This is not a stretch since there were hedge funds that did make billions from the financial collapse in 2008.

If a model is clearly working in significant ways, it is useful to ask whether allegiance to one’s biases is more important than being on the right side of major trends on this planet. One of the worst things a person can do in this rapidly-evolving environment is get in front of a major negative trend and stay put thinking that trend is not important. Millions have gone bankrupt in recent years doing just that. In the markets, they call it picking up pennies in front of a bulldozer. Sometimes having a good or bad model is a matter of life or death, for example, a bad model about the nature of the Nazi party brought horrific suffering and the deaths of many millions. (Side note: Thundering-Heard.com exists because I think understanding and heeding good models versus bad ones could very well be a matter of life or death over the next few years, or perhaps even months.)

Handling predictions

One more brief topic, and then on to predictions about the Transition: What is a person supposed to do when they hear a prediction about the world? Assuming that they want to do anything at all, here is an approach from some people whose livelihood depends on their expert handling of predictions. When you hear a prediction:

1. Put aside the natural human propensity for wanting to know immediately whether the prediction is correct. This is emotion coming to the fore. All of the remaining steps are about eliminating emotion from this process so that rationality, research, and observation can take their rightful place.

2. Consider the prediction a script about how the future will unfold.

3. After giving it some thought, assign a rating, say from 1 to 100, on whether you think the predicted event can possibly emerge from current conditions. If it has any chance of emerging, write down the script and place it in your script pile wherein scripts about the future are sorted by your numeric ranking. If there is no chance that the event can arise from current conditions, then throw it out.

4. If the outcome of a script would be important to you, do research on the topic and, if it is appropriate based on your research, adjust your numeric ranking for the prediction in the future script pile. If there is a way to investigate the track record of the person making the prediction, and on the internet there often is, this can help a lot in rating a prediction. People with a bad track record are typically operating from a narrow or faulty model and usually continue doing so. Few people, especially people who have achieved some fame using one model, will admit their errors and find a better model.

5. Watch as evidence about all of your scripts unfolds and adjust your script pile accordingly, tossing out scripts where emerging events show a script to be faulty, and upwardly adjusting the numeric rankings of those scripts where the evidence is pointing to the idea that they might be right.

Through this process, predictions that are false are discarded and those that are true rise to the top of the pile. Emotions are kept at bay, biases fall as evidence accumulates, observation and logic guide the process. And you learn a lot about how the world works.

The Evidence

So what have we observed?

1. Acceleration, evident in a wide variety of ways, including:

2. Weather extremes and wildness, including floods, windstorms, typhoons/hurricanes, tornadoes, heat waves, droughts, superstorms, etc. The insurance industry reports a greater than tripling of “loss-related weather events” since 1980. (Part 1)

3. Earthquakes of magnitude 6.0 or greater up more than 50% since 1990. (Part 1)

4. Tsunamis up fivefold in this century versus the last. (Part 1)

5. Volcanic eruptions clearly on the rise. (Part 1)

6. Magnetic poles on an accelerating shift accompanied by hemispheric temperature changes . (Part 2)

7. Sea level rise. (Part 3)

8. Species extinction rising exponentially along with rising human population. (Part 3)

9. Sinkholes increasing rapidly enough to go from obscurity to the mainstream media. (Part 4)

10. Asteroid encounters appear to be on the rise. (Part 4)

11. Nuclear plants compromised by the increasing earth and weather changes causing problems for people. (Part 4)

12. People’s perception of time as speeding up. (Part 5)

13. An exponential rise in the price/performance of technology. (Part 5)

14. Exponential growth in money, debt, and unemployment. (Part 5)

15. Exponential growth in the amassing of physical gold by those, such as China and the oil sheikdoms, who supply real goods for all this printed money. (Part 5)

16. Relentless growth in the prices of real goods such as food and fossil fuels in response to the massive influx of printed money.

17. Despite an exponential increase in money printing, borrowing, and spending by governments to simulate economies, these same economies remain moribund and these tactics clearly show diminishing returns. (Part 5)

18. The “age of truth” brings increasing revelations of lies and truth. (Part 6)

And with people, acceleration is bringing increases in (Part 7):

19. Communication/connectedness.

20. Inner work.

21. Insistence on knowledge over belief.

22. Group consciousness.

23. A changing attitude toward the physical sciences.

And increasing exploration of (Part 7):

24. Healing methods.

25. The energetic nature of everything.

26. That energy is different at different locations on the planet.

27. The multi-plane nature of life.

28. Interaction with nature intelligences.

29. People changing from “what can I get” to “what can I do to help.”

And accelerating (Part 7):

30. General insanity.

31. Use of legal and illegal drugs and of alcohol to cope with acceleration.

Predictions

OK, so where will this lead us? Does anyone have a model that accounts for accelerating change in most if not all aspects of life on this planet? A model which we might then be able to look to for guidance about the future, from which we could actually expect some reliability?

Surprisingly, yes.  In early 2007, I was fortunate enough to run into such a model described in a book published in 2003. It went into my script pile at the time. Given that the book had been published four years earlier, I was able to evaluate whether a portion of its predictions were coming true or not, and they definitely were. I was already convinced prior to reading the book that we were likely to experience an all-out collapse of the financial system within 5 to 7 years. The book entirely agreed with that perspective, but it took things way beyond the financial world and covered the topic of the Transition from historical, geologic, meteorological, political, educational, occult, and cosmological perspectives, to name a few.  And this wasn’t a book of vague wishy-washy predictions that could be interpreted several ways. It was exceedingly specific. Here is what it said—and this was in 2003, before the explosive growth of sub-prime mortgages being sold to anyone who could fog a mirror, with those mortgages being packaged up and sold to institutions across the world as blue-ribbon, good-as-gold, AAA-rated securities—about the real estate bubble. And this was when almost all people considered real estate a perfect investment, something whose price could never go down, something that was definitely not a bubble at all:

Many who pulled their money out of the stock market…rushed to invest these funds in real estate, but again this mad rush created yet another bubble of inflated real estate. Finance companies, mortgage brokers, and banks readily accorded mortgage loans to these buyers. Once they obtained the signature of the borrower on the loans papers, they sold the mortgages to non-bank secondary mortgage companies. In order to purchase these mortgages, these secondary mortgage companies borrowed money by issuing bonds and derivatives on these bonds.

In essence, though this convoluted maze of borrowing, these non-bank financial institutions…own indirectly most properties purchased with a mortgage…

As the world economy deflates, more and more people will lose their jobs, they will default on their house mortgage payments, and be thrown out into the streets. The sinister secondary mortgage companies will take possession of the property.

When mortgage defaults reach a critical mass, the secondary mortgage companies will collapse leaving a wasteland of properties. This will spell the end of the financial grip the Dark Forces hold on the world, and the towers of finance they have spent centuries to build will fall one by one like dominoes.

So what we have here is an exceedingly accurate description of the work-in-progress that is the real estate bubble and its associated derivatives taking down the financial system. Lots of “dominoes” have already fallen. In 2007, Wall St had five big investment banks. The sub-prime mortgage collapse took three of them to insolvency—Merrill Lynch, Bear Stearns, and Lehman Bros—which were either broken up or absorbed into other companies, and it would have taken down the last two, Goldman Sachs and JP Morgan, but the government temporarily stabilized them by saying the they were now backed by FDIC deposit insurance even though they had never before paid a penny into the FDIC insurance program. In fact, they had shunned the FDIC program because they wanted less regulation.

As tracked by the Mortgage Lender Implod-o-Meter, 388 US and 13 non-US mortgage lenders have gone belly up so far. This includes giants such as “secondary mortgage companies” Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and lenders such Countrywide, Washington Mutual, and Wachovia Mortgage. (The full list is here.) And now with sinister companies like Blackrock rushing in to buy foreclosed houses, the game is not completely over, but it won’t be long before the dominoes have all fallen.

Anyway, back to this book I’ve been speaking of. Of the 31 trends identified above, this book covered 26 of them, and for all I know, I may have forgotten references to the other five.

The book is The Sanctus Germanus Prophecies, Volume 1 by Michael Mau. It was followed by Volume 2 in 2006, and Volume 3 in 2009. The books can be purchased here or here.

There are a lot of books out there these days that are really highly-padded versions of what  could be a five or ten page article.  Mau’s books are not in that category, as demonstrated by the quote above, that is, the real estate crisis was discussed in detail on one page and that was it, the author moved on to other topics.  So an attempt to summarize the vast array of information in these books will do them serious injustice, but I will make the attempt anyway as a conclusion to this series of posts. The best advice, of course, is to read the books:

We are living in a period of transition during which much that impedes humanity’s evolution—warmongering, the manipulation/exploitation for power and profit of the many by a very few, the intentional distraction of people from their higher self, and so forth–will be cleared away. Energetic acceleration and earth changes will assure that this clearing/cleansing process takes place. The transition is a normal period of relative rest in the vast multi-billion year evolutionary cycle of our solar system called the manvantara in which people evolve through hundreds and even thousands of incarnations. Many people, called lightbearers in these books, incarnated now with the intention of helping people through this turbulent process and preserving, through the period of the transition, that which is conducive to people’s true evolution. The overall goal of the transition is to place humanity in a new golden age in which people can pursue soul liberation with excellent support and without interference. Getting to that golden age requires the dissolution of those organizations that serve the interests of those who seek to control everyone else for their own power and for material acquisition far beyond what any person would need during a lifetime. Since these organizations are not going quietly, we are dealing with increasing turbulence during which all people will have to decide where they stand with respect to war and the array of slaveries that permeate civilization. The degree of turbulence that can be expected is strongly related to whether or not people wake up and stand on the side of freedom and conscious evolution.

Volume 2 lists twelve regions on the planet that are called spiritual regions, higher elevation areas away from the coasts that, while not immune to the earth changes, are relatively safe with respect them, and which are conducive to lightbearers retrieving those abilities they cultivated in prior incarnations.

Here are some highlights from the timetable at the back of Volume 2:

2005-2012:

  • Severe worldwide economic and financial crisis
  • World economy hits bottom and stays there, all conventional efforts to revive it fail
  • Water-related catastrophes: tsunamis, hurricanes, rise in sea level, floods of lowlands and coastal areas
  • Spiritual Regions on higher ground begin to develop: initial preparations

2013-2020:

  • Water-related catastrophes multiply making more and more low-lying areas uninhabitable
  • Massive population displacements to higher ground
  • Spiritual Regions take hold as lightbearers find their way there
  • Period of Reconstruction: Transitional societies begin to consolidate in the Spiritual Regions

2021-2080

  • Indications of major continental shifts, rifts, and movements begin to perturb the earth’s surface

There is a lot more to these books that what I’ve summarized here. They place the Transition in a perspective that ranges from the innermost to the cosmic. They say that, far from being over, that we are early in many of the accelerating trends identified above. These books have risen to the top of my “script pile.” They have become a stable platform from which to view the changes and turbulence in the world, and have given me confidence that life on this planet can and will be changed, and vastly for the better, and that this goal is way beyond worth working for. These days, when I hear a prediction–and I do seek out a lot of them–if it clearly conflicts with the information in these books, I relegate it to the category of “very unlikely,” and that repeatedly works very well.

One of the main reasons that so many predictions go awry is because they are drawn from experience of a small slice of life. We hear predictions all the time about finance, politics, weather, health, the use of energy, the environment, social trends, and now even meteors and comets. I contend that so many of those predictions go awry because they work from a narrow band and fail to take into account the larger context. Most would relate to maybe one or a few of the 31 trends identified above. Mau’s books place almost all of these individual trends in the context of a much larger one.

And seeing all of these trends in their larger context is precisely what we need right now as change permeates, well, just about everything! A narrowly focused model has no chance of accounting for across-the-board acceleration in, for example, finance, earth changes, mass shootings, and the emergence of truth.

So what’s a person to do about all this?

It is truly up to each person.

What would I do? I will provide a detailed post about that soon where I will contend that a wait-and-see attitude about these changes is no longer appropriate. Life is, as usual, being very kind by giving us a preview of exactly how this will all unfold by not bringing change all at once, but by ramping up all of these trends. But it’s up to us to read the signs and take action.

In the mean time, if you haven’t done so already, you may want to do your own research on these topics. If you come to some understandings, an action plan may naturally emerge from what you learn.

One piece of advice I would give is to never underestimate the power of an accelerating trend. As trends become obviously exponential, they can be quite breathtaking in their speed, power, and scope. As a friend from Cyprus told me: “On Friday night, when we went to sleep, everything was normal. On Saturday, we were told that the banks were closed and that we would have very restricted access to our bank accounts and that we might lose a lot of our the money.” When things change these days, they can change radically and quickly.

There are suggestions for dealing with the collapse of the financial system in the post What then can we do?.

And I leave you with outstanding comments on this topic from Gandhi: View the Forces of Nature bringing Earth Changes as Opportunity to Change the World.

Thanks very much for reading this long series and this long post.

We interrupt this program…

For two items:

1. The Cyprus Bailout
2. Gold: Last Chance

That title phrase was used when normal television programming was to be interrupted for a special news announcement. And this post is an interruption of sorts—of the What is the Transition series—though actually it is a continuation of a general theme here: Lots of the events that we are all seeing—from earth and weather changes to financial events to the fact that more and more people are taking up meditation by the day—are hints, clues, indicators of things to come. They are not isolated one-off events. They are part of a trend, signs to be read and understood to see what’s coming next. Life has been very kind, bringing things on in evolutionary fashion for anyone who wishes to heed the signs. But things are ramping up. This strongly favors action over a wait-and-see attitude. This first story is a perfect example:

1. The Cyprus Bailout

Europe Does It Again: Cyprus Depositor Haircut “Bailout” Turns Into Saver “Panic”, Frozen Assets, Bank Runs, Broken ATMs

The fifth European national bailout pertains to Cyprus, where receipt of the bailout money is contingent on the confiscation of money directly from people’s bank accounts. The government will take 6.75% of the deposits of anyone with under 100,000 Euros. And they will take 9.9% of anything over 100,000 Euros.

The people will not send in this money, it will be taken directly from their accounts on Tuesday if the Cypriot legislature approves the bailout plan.

Funds to pay the levy were frozen in accounts immediately, ECB Executive Board Member Joerg Asmussen said. The levy will be assessed before Cypriot banks reopen on March 19 after a March 18 national holiday. Sarris said electronic transfers will also be limited until then.

When bankers and politicians want someone’s money…

If a word to the wise is sufficient, one can only hope that more will gain wisdom from this event.  One German newspaper is already suggesting today that a 15% “wealth tax” be levied in Italy to help with its debt problem.

2. Gold: Last Chance

Jim Sinclair (there is always a link to his web site JSMineSet.com on the Thundering-Heard BlogRoll) held lots of gold in the precious metals bull market of the 1980’s, riding the price from $40 to $850 per ounce. He sold his holdings on the very day of the top price in 1980 and thus entered the ranks of investment legends.

In 2003, he started a web site and went public with the prediction, which he reiterated many times in the years that followed, that gold would rise from its 2003 price in the mid-$300’s to $1,620 per ounce by January 2011. He was roundly derided for both the predicted rise of the price and for the precision of the predicted timeframe. It turned out he was off by 8 months: gold’s price did not rise to $1,620 until August of 2011, not January.

The gold price in dollars has been in a sideways correction since late 2011. Recently, Jim has been pounding the table that the current sideways movement in the gold price will be complete before the end of this month, March 2013, and begin its next phase of upward price movement to $3,500 per ounce and beyond. When Jim makes predictions about gold, it pays to listen.

If anyone has been hesitant about buying gold because of claims by those who have been wrong all along about gold that the gold bull market was over, that the “gold bubble” has popped, let’s just look at a few charts, first of gold, and then of charts where bubbles did pop. I think you’ll be able to clearly see that the people claiming a “bubble pop” for gold don’t know the first thing about how to read charts, meaning that they know very little indeed about financial markets. Here’s the longer term chart of gold, from the year 2000 through now:

GoldSince2000 Notice that sideways price drift at the top right of the chart? Chart readers call this a “correction in an ongoing bull market.” It’s a bull market taking a breather before powering higher.

Now, want to see what the chart of a real popped bubble looks like? Here’s a chart of the Nasdaq stock index from Stockcharts.com. This index represented the internet and tech stocks during that time when we were told that there was a new paradigm, that everyone remotely connected with technology was going to be rich rich rich because they had started a web site to sell, well, whatever, it didn’t matter at the time:

Nasd_Bubble

Notice the parabolic upmove as price increased 15-fold in less than 10 years and then: SPLAT! A high-speed drop of 78% in just over two years. Thirteen years and trillions of printed dollars later, the Nasdaq is still 36% below that all-time high price.

Here’s the chart of crude oil from 2003 to 2009 with price rising to $140 per barrel and then crashing back to $32 per barrel in less than a year:

CrudeCrash

Note in both of those cases, no sideways price movement for months and months, as is seen on the gold chart, just a sharp fast very-nasty price crash.

I think Jim Sinclair is correct. I published back in June 2012 (What then can we do?) that people might want to complete their conversion from paper/electronic currency into gold by August 2012. That was a good idea. But cycles research at the time showed that it was possible that we would get one more price downmove, into March of 2013 at the latest, so I did not label that Summer 2012 opportunity as the “last chance” to get gold at a decent price. Now price has come down again into that same area where it was during the Summer of 2012. This time I think that “last chance” phrase is appropriate. Jim Sinclair says, and I agree, that after this month, you won’t ever be able to buy gold anywhere near $1,600 per ounce again.

Gold Goes Mainstream

Gross: Stock and bond managers today must be alchemists: turn lead into gold. NOT likely. Too much lead (bubbled assets).
–Tweet from Bill Gross, Founder of PIMCO, which manages $1.8 trillion

**************

“Do you own gold?” “Oh yeah. I do…There’s no sensible reason not to have some.”
–Ray Dalio to the Council on Foreign Relations

This is being written to put the precious metals market in a larger context for those people who still see the world proceeding much as it has proceeded in the past, a world without the large financial and supply chain disruptions that we foresee.

Strong multi-year upmoves in the price of any asset, aka a secular bull market in that asset, go through three stages:

  1. The speculative, early-proponent phase during which the mainstream investment community ignores or derides the potential of that asset.
  2. The mainstream phase, where the mainstream decides that exposure to that asset is a good idea for just about everyone.
  3. The mania phase, where just about everyone feels that they must own that asset and will tell you so when you meet them by chance in the supermarket.

Phase 1 for gold has been marked by derision from the mainstream investment community. Quoting Keynes, they call gold the “barbarous relic.” Otherwise-intelligent economic commentators such as Nouriel Roubini have been calling for a price top in gold for several years. Some who are old enough to have experienced the gold bull market of the 1970s have been saying, “We heard all this before in the 1970s, anyone who buys gold now will regret it later.” All of these people have been wrong all along as gold and silver have powered higher in price.

During most of Phase 1, the major central banks of the world have been sellers of gold, preferring to buy government bonds of various countries (such as Greece and Spain!) to “get a return” on their money. Gold has been a far better investment for the last 12 years. Over the last three years, central banks have become net buyers of gold, to the tune of hundreds of tons per year. Most but not all of this buying has come from Asia as the western central banks have been preoccupied with printing money in a mad scramble to keep their markets afloat.

Gold has been in Phase 1 since 2001. Most in the financial community regard it as an annoyance when their clients ask about it. The price increased from $256 in 2001 to $1,911 in August, 2011.

A couple of weeks ago, Ray Dalio gave a presentation to the CFR. He was asked if he owned gold, and he said, “Oh yeah. I do.” This marked the start of Phase 2, the mainstream phase.

Who is Ray Dalio? Most people in the investment community respect him as the best active hedge fund manager on the planet. We mentioned his firm, Bridgewater Associates, in a previous post. They manage about $140 billion. Ray is highly respected in both financial and political circles.

And the CFR is the Council on Foreign Relations. If you had to pick one organization that has the most influence on the mainstream political thought in the US, it would have to be the CFR. It was founded by the Rockefellers. You have to apply for membership. There are currently 4,700 members, including Bill Clinton, Robert Zoellick, Janet Yellen, Paul Wolfowitz, Lloyd Blankfein, Jamie Dimon…in other words, the CFR is the public face of The Powers That Be/Were.

Now that all of these mainstream movers and shakers have heard from what some consider the smartest money man on the planet that owning gold is a good idea, well, if we haven’t yet convinced you to get rid of a mainstream financial advisor such as a broker, said broker is likely to be calling you in the not-too-distant future with their “innovative” idea that you should get some gold. Of course, being mainstream, they will likely advise you to own it in paper rather than physical form, which will be a big mistake, but that will be their advice. And they will advise that you put a maximum of 5% of your assets into gold or gold mining stocks. In normal times, this would characterize the mainstream phase for gold, during which its price would rise steadily for years.

More evidence that we’ve entered the mainstream phase comes from Bill Gross, known to many as the “Bond King.” Gross founded PIMCO, which manages over $1.8 trillion. Yes, that’s trillion with a T. Almost all of the money is in conservative bond funds. But here’s a tweet this week from Gross:

Gross: Stock and bond managers today must be alchemists: turn lead into gold. NOT likely. Too much lead (bubbled assets).

Note that Gross, the Bond King, is saying that stocks and bonds are bubble markets. That money managers should turn that lead into gold. Though he also says that’s not likely.
Those who hate gold claim gold is in a bubble. Great examples of bubble markets are internet stocks in 1998 through early 2000; or real estate running up to 2006; or government bonds now. Gold, on the other hand, has had a nice steady rise for years, nothing meteoric or bubble-like at all. And here is someone, Bill Gross, who may know more about bonds than anyone on the planet, saying that bonds and stocks are the bubble, not gold.

Gold can’t possibly enter a bubble until it enters Phase 3, the mania phase. During this phase, you will be regaled on a regular basis from media sources and individuals with stories of people who got rich from gold and silver. Like the stock day traders of the year 2000, or the real estate flippers of 2006, there will be lots people trading gold on a daily basis, probably at gold trading shops like the day trading shops that were operating in 1999. People will be quitting their jobs to trade precious metals to “make their fortune.” 90% of people who talk about gold will assure you that it is the surest thing on earth to guaranteed riches. CEOs of gold mining companies will be like rock stars, getting interviewed by Charlie Rose. That’s what a bubble looks like. How many people do you know who own gold and silver?

Now, with the acceleration that is all around us, it is unlikely that we will proceed through these three phases of a secular bull market as we would in normal times. It is far more likely that gold will have a meteoric rise quite soon. But if you think that the world will proceed in a conventional manner in the years to come, we have outlined the path of the precious metals for you.

Slings and Arrows

To be or not to be, that is the question:
Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles
And by opposing, end them.
Shakespeare, Hamlet

Sometimes slings and arrows feel very difficult indeed. But sometimes, and I guess some would say always, they are our friends, as they help to end pernicious cycles. Our increasingly-being-shown-as-notorious financial system is experiencing its end-of-cycle as its lies and chief liars are exposed, as major world banks have been shutting down public access to their systems for days at a time, as criminal hackers have figured out how to pilfer billions from the accounts of high net worth individuals at banks, etc.

We documented the base-level lies in The financial system is based on twelve promises that are lies. But each and every week now, more of the operational lies of the system are revealed.

Matt Taibbi of Rolling Stone reported on a court case showing that the big banks have for decades criminally deceived participants in the municipal bond market, robbing cities, towns, hospitals, etc. of interest payments due to them: The Scam Wall Street Learned From the Mafia.

Too bad that cities and towns are going broke, the banksters must get their bonuses. And their posh offices. Drive around any city in the industrialized world. Who has the largest and fanciest buildings, whose buildings dominate the skylines? Banks and insurance companies. Check it out. But I digress. Back to the latest slings and arrows.

Everyone has probably heard about the LIBOR scandal where the big banks–and it is looking like most or all of them–colluded in criminal fashion to manipulate interest rates. The LIBOR rate is used to calculate the interest rates on myriad types of loans including mortgages, business loans, credit card rates, etc. It is used as the basis for hundreds of trillions of dollars worth of derivatives. The top executives at Barclay’s were the first to be caught, but now RBS has been fined, and Deutsche Bank is under investigation. Others will follow. And the fired CEO of Barclay’s, Bob Diamond, has publicly stated that he was told to manipulate LIBOR by the guy who is second in command at the Bank of England, Paul Tucker. How long before we find out the US Federal Reserve was giving out the same kinds of orders for illegal acts?

And speaking of investigations, how about Spain investigating the top executives of  Bankia, headquarters pictured here, I kid you not:

Photo from Mike Krieger’s site.

A year ago, when they were selling stock in the bank to the public, these executives touted Bankia’s greatness. They stated two months ago that everything was fine, in fact profitable, at Bankia. Within a few weeks, it was determined that the bank needed a $19 billion bailout.

And it looks like JP Morgan has been caught pulling an Enron, manipulating the electric power market in California and the Midwest: JPMorgan’s Role in Power Market Comes Under Scrutiny.

The Vatican can’t resist joining the financial criminality party, assisted, of course, by JP Morgan: Catholic Church Fears Growing Vatican Bank Scandal.

We also have the mystery of large banks shutting their systems to any public access. RBS, one of the biggest UK banks, had a major “system outage” for days that halted the processing of just about everything including credit and debit cards, ATMs, payroll checks, account balance inquiries, i.e., everything! See: As RBS’ ATM “Glitch” Enters Fifth Day, The Bailed Out Bank Issues A Statement.

And yesterday the largest bank in Russia stopped all public access to its systems, so no credit or debit cards swipes would work, no on-line transactions, etc.: RBS ‘Glitch’ Goes Airborne As Biggest Russian Bank Halts All Credit, Debit Card Operations.

RBS gave a potentially plausible explanation of their outage in testimony to the UK Treasury: RBS gives more detail on IT failure train wreck.

However, it seems suspicious that the biggest bank in Russia also had to shut out the public. Perhaps it had something to do with criminal hackers figuring out how to initiate wire transfers from the accounts of high net worth individuals at 60 banks! Haven’t heard of that one? It broke in the news about two weeks ago and was promptly “disappeared” from many websites. As of this minute, the story is still currently available at the Times of India: Cyber criminals may have siphoned off 2 billion euros from 60 banks. From the article:

The study highlighted a highly sophisticated, multi-tiered, global financial fraud ring that is comprised of at least a dozen groups using active and passive automated transfer systems to steal high value amounts from high balance accounts.

“This fraud empire, dubbed Operation High Roller, has impacted every class of financial institution: credit union, large global bank and regional bank, using smaller and less detectable automated transactions,” McAfee said in a statement.

Could it be that these banks recognize that they are being hacked, and their accounts drained, and they have no way to stop it other than preventing all public access to their systems? And why did coverage of this story virtually disappear? That’s an easy one: When criminal hackers hear that a class of juicy targets is hackable, it’s like pouring blood into water near sharks, they all want a piece of the action.  And we can’t have depositors getting nervous about their deposits when the whole system is based on confidence.

Perhaps the problem isn’t hacking. But then how could these large bank systems, famous for their redundancies, backups, and all-around bulletproofness, fail in such catastrophic ways? Could it be that the Sun has decided to make a statement or two about who really runs this sector of the universe? Did 18 M-class solar flares over three days cause glitches in these systems? (Eighteen (18) M-Class Flares Within Last 72 Hours) Followed by an X-class solar flare? (Sunspot Region 1515 Fires Off X-Class Flare) Or are their systems based on MS-Windows? (Joke. Sort of.)

Either way, I have to wonder how people with their savings in electronic accounts feel about that. The system is based on lies. The people who run it are pulling continuous criminal capers, and it looks like they have been doing so for decades. Hackers have figured out how to drain accounts electronically. And the Sun may even be contributing to bank computer mayhem, with NASA admitting that the Sun will be ramping up its activity into mid-2013.

We think it best to consider all of these as indications of a system that is in something beyond peril. It is going down. It will fail. It’s only a matter of time. The pace of slings and arrows impacting the system is accelerating.

Let’s recall that people value money because it is a medium of exchange through which a wild variety of good and services can be exchanged in some comparable way; and a store of value providing one way to save the energy expended in work today to meet needs at some future time. Our current paper currencies (Dollar, Euro, Pound, Yen, etc.) are masters of exchange, but are cascading toward failure as stores of value. Some who have studied the history of money say–and I have no way to verify this–that the longest reigning currency regime based on unbacked paper lasted 41 years. Well, the world went fully into unbacked paper currency in 1971. Add 41 years and you get 2012. Can we set a new record? Perhaps. But the system is showing so many signs of being in its death throes, why take the chance?

People keeping their savings in the banking/brokerage system reminds me of the old Eddie Murphy comedy routine where he asks about movies like Poltergeist and Amityville Horror, “When there’s a ghost in the house, why don’t white people just leave the house?” If profanity offends you, don’t go to the link.

We have all been warned. Over and over. And the warnings are increasingly clear and loud. But we can take arms against this sea of troubles, at least for ourselves. And if we do, we’ll be in a position to help when the slings and arrows end this financial system.

Where there are things to be done, the end is not to survey and recognize the various things, but to do them.
Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics

The financial system is based on twelve promises that are lies, Part 2

In yesterday’s Part 1, we covered these lies:

Lie #1: Real estate always goes up.

Lie #2: It’s best to use Other People’s Money.

Lie #3: We can buy cheap goods from countries with cheap labor, and yet keep our much-higher salaries and benefits.

Lie #4: Government pension and medical programs will deliver on their promises.

Lie #5: Your money is in the bank

Lie #6: Your money is in your brokerage account.

Lie #7: It is OK for financial institutions to use huge leverage.

Lie #8: The government guarantees it.

Today, we’ll cover the final four:

Lie #9: Government bonds are safe.

Most people are told, and believe, that the big culprit in the Great Depression of the 1930s was the stock market crash. This is an intentional re-writing of history. At least 10 times more money was lost when governments defaulted on their bonds in the early 1930s. These defaults were the source of thousands of bank failures, which led to untold numbers of farm, business, and personal financial failures, so the actual losses were far larger than the “10 times” cited above.

Who re-wrote that history and why? Governments, and the academic henchmen they support through direct employment or research grants. Governments and these hired academics conveniently ignore these government bond defaults because they want you to have full trust in government bills and bonds. Again, why? Because these bonds underpin the entire financial regime. When a bank claims to have capital, much of that capital is in the form of government bills and bonds. Same for insurance companies, pension funds, brokerages, etc.

And why did governments default on their bonds in the 1930s? Because they borrowed more than they could pay back. Sound familiar? Let’s forget about the incomprehensible trillions for now. Let’s just treat the US government like a household.

Monthly Income:       $1,900.
Monthly Expenses:   $3,000.

Monthly Borrowing to meet current expenses: $1,100.

So if this household went to their bank and said, “Look, I know I’ve been borrowing 60% more than I make each month to meet my expenses, and that I’m adding $1,100 to what I owe you each and every month, but you know, I really need that money.” How long do you think the bank would keep lending them a new $1,100 each month? Money that gets spent as soon as it has been borrowed.

Convert those hundreds to trillions and you have a good picture of US fiscal finances. Japan is doing far worse. The UK is similar to the US. Despite the evidence of history, people treat governments as if they are eternal, as if they will never fall. That they’ll pay back what they owe someday. History looks askance at that idea as well, as we have seen from the 1930s.

And for those who think that the alleged economic recovery is going to make these numbers better for the US, that this “recovery” is real, think again: The borrowing that the US has been doing for the last three years is equal to almost 10% of GDP, that is, it’s almost 10% of all the spending on goods and services that happens in the US each year. And they are claiming that the economy is growing at about 2% per year, which is itself an over-estimate. So what would happen if they stopped this borrowing and spending of 10% of the economy? The math is easy, and it’s called a severe depression, with the economy shrinking big time every year and so the government would have lower income from taxes and higher expenses for unemployment, food stamps, etc., putting them even further in the hole.

So, aren’t the people who usually buy treasury bills and bonds getting antsy about all this? Some clearly are, including “small players” like China. So the US, Japanese, and UK governments are doing what they call quantitative easing. Since this is a system steeped in lies, they don’t just say “printing money,” they have to come up with a BS term for it. (And they aren’t entirely stupid about that. Ask a few people what quantitative easing is. Most don’t know.) So the central bank of each country prints up money to buy the bonds and bills issued by the treasury when the treasury needs to borrow more money. The US Federal Reserve bought about two-thirds of the bonds sold by the US Treasury in 2011, so they covered two-thirds of the borrowing with newly printed money. If our household above had done that, its inhabitants would soon be in jail for counterfeiting, but that’s a topic for another day.

And one might think that governments can simply raise taxes to pay for these gargantuan debts. That might be true if the people weren’t already up to their eyeballs in debt. Historically, when all the debt in a country gets near three times their Gross Domestic Product, the country groans under this unsustainable debt load and has events like the Great Depression of the 1930s. According to Lacy Hunt, former member of the Federal Reserve Board (and I only cite that credential so you don’t think these numbers come from some deranged blogger), that total debt ratio is now 3.6 times GDP in the US, after peaking at 3.8x in 2009. Think the Eurozone is any better? They are at 4.5x! The UK is at 4.7x. And Japan is at 5x! (From Strategic Investment Conference – Dr. Lacy Hunt)

According to Boston University Prof. Kotlikoff, a guy who is enough of an insider that his work is sometimes published by the US Federal Reserve, when you consider all the future spending commitments of the US Government: “US government liabilities (official debt plus the present value of projected future non-interest spending) exceed government assets (the present value of projected future taxes) by $211 trillion, roughly 14 times GDP.” (From Shattering the American dream: The US government’s Ponzi scheme) In other words, unpayable doesn’t even begin to describe the situation.

So, it is clear that government bonds are a fraud. At some point, the holders of these bonds will not get back their capital and their expected interest payments, as the buyers of Greek government bonds recently found out. The only way these bonds are being kept afloat is by newly printed money. It’s a scheme, a Ponzi scheme, where new money has to be brought in to satisfy earlier investors. Such schemes always fail. This one will as well. You can take that to the bank. But as I think you can tell, we don’t recommend that. Taking it to the bank, that is. Because the bank–at least if it’s a large one–is part of the scheme. And so are your insurance companies, pension plans, etc. Take action accordingly.

Lie #10: Derivatives reduce risk in the system

Derivatives, famously called “weapons of financial mass destruction,” are a big topic, but it’s an important topic to understand because, when the derivatives implode, the whole financial regime will implode. We will do our best to keep it simple and sort of brief. If the description of this lie makes your mind fog, move on to Lies #11 and #12. They are easier to understand, and not to be missed.

A derivative is a financial instrument, a contract, whose value is derived from the value of some underlying asset. Examples of derivatives that have functioned well for years are agricultural futures, where a farmer and a grain buyer agree in the Spring on the price of a railroad car of oats for delivery in December. Both enter the contract to make their pricing in December predictable, removing some of the risk of running their businesses.

But the banksters couldn’t leave it alone. They created derivatives to insure against just about every conceivable financial eventuality. But they sell this insurance without setting aside the reserves typically required for writing insurance policies. Such reserves are normally required to cover the flow of insurance claims that inevitably arise. They sell these instruments to entities who are trying to reduce some financial risk they face, like currency movements, interest rate changes, a default on some bonds they own, etc. Some of the modern derivatives are so complex that, when the parties to a derivative contract have ended up in court, the court ruled that the 600-page contract that defined the derivative didn’t sufficiently cover all the contingencies! These derivatives are sold by the big banks and insurance companies to all sorts of financial entities from corporations to school systems to hedge funds. The school systems are trying to reduce risk; the hedge funds use derivatives as a casino bet. Since the instruments are complex, the banks charge big fees for access to these contracts.

This is now so out of hand that there are over $700 trillion worth of derivative contracts out there in the world. Yes, that’s more than 10 times the size of the world economy. These are insurance policies that obviously cannot be paid if the claims come in. And when the claims come in, the big writers of these insurance policies, the big banks, will be understood, for yet another reason, to be entirely bankrupt. And that money everyone thought they had in the bank will be gone, vaporized. When all that money is vaporized, there will be no money coming from your ATM, no ability to withdraw some from the bank, no paychecks (the checks will bounce), no ability to pay bills, no tax payments going to governments, etc.

So instead of derivatives reducing risk, which is what their proponents claim that they do, derivatives have concentrated risk in the very large banks, which puts the entire system at risk for the sake of large bankster profits.

So why is it inevitable that the derivative market will implode? After all, while no one denies that there are over $700 trillion of derivatives, and no one claims to have anywhere near that amount of money available, the banksters claim they will never have to pay up on that insurance. Here’s their reasoning:

  1. The things they write insurance for won’t ever happen, at least not to any extent that will have a big impact on anyone. And how do they know this? Because they have based their insurance on mathematical models designed by very fancy mathematicians and physicists. But the problem is this: their models are based on data from a small sampling of history. The data rarely even includes data from the era of the Great Depression. So here’s what happened in 2007-2009: some derivatives were based on pools of mortgages. These models assumed, because that’s what they saw in the historical data, that real estate prices always go up. As soon as real estate prices started going down in mid-2006, the payments on these mortgage-backed derivatives came due. And the banksters didn’t have the money to pay up. We all know how it ended, some failed, and the governments bailed out the rest. So when just one very small slice of the derivative payments came due, payments the banks and our beloved central banks said would never come due, the entire system was threatened. The rest of the derivatives in the world are based on similarly inadequate models. They will prove especially inadequate as the world faces the accelerating change that is apparent to so many of us. It is impossible that these mathematical models can account for events that have never happened on the planet before, or that only happen once every several thousand years.
  2. The banksters claim that, even though they may have written contracts for $100 trillion, their book of contracts is balanced, that it is hedged. By this, they mean that, if Spain defaults on its debts, that they have contracts that say that it will and contracts that say that it won’t. They will lose money on one set of contracts and make an equal amount of money on the other contracts. While multiple cases have shown this claim of being hedged to be an outright lie, it has a deeper underlying problem. Let’s say JP Morgue has a bunch of customers who want to buy insurance against a default by Spain. That would be a very unbalanced position for the Morgue. So they go to Bankrupt of America and buy protection against Spain defaulting. Now they think they are hedged, balanced. But there are less than a dozen banks in the world handling the vast majority of this $700 trillion in insurance. Remember AIG in 2008? They were a big writer of mortgage-pool-related insurance in 2007. They were not hedged. They were unable to pay. That inability to pay would have taken down several other institutions who thought they were covered because of insurance they had purchased from AIG. AIG needed a government bailout of $185 billion or the other banks would have gone under. So all it takes is one of those banks to make an error, to not be hedged, to not be able to pay up, and suddenly each of the others is also going under. This is where the concept of the Too Big To Fail banks has come in. All of them are so interconnected that if one fails, they all fail.

So then you might say, well won’t there just be another bank bailout by the governments? Two problems with that. First, no one can come up with anywhere near $700 trillion to fix a cascading failure of the mega-banks. If they printed that much money, the money you currently have would be seen by all to be worthless. Think wheelbarrows of money, hyper-inflation. Second, as we have seen, people have less and less trust in government finances. A large part of the temporary system fixes done in 2008-2009 were not the actual printing of money, they were guarantees. But if everyone understands that a government providing a guarantee is broke, then what is that guarantee worth? Bupkas. Nada. Nothing.

But this is, in fact, what the TBTF banks are counting on: they have a gun to the head of the governments, saying “you have to cover our backs on this huge and very profitable game or we’ll take down your system.”

So when the derivatives implode, all the electronic money in the world will be known to be either gone (fully imploded system) or worthless (tens or hundreds of trillions gets printed up, making all currency worth a tiny fraction of their current purchasing power).

Lie #11: Central banks protect the interests of their country and its citizens

Let’s just get right to the truth about this lie: Central banks protect the interests of large commercial banks. And not all banks. Just the really large ones. The central banks we are speaking of are the international ones, namely the Bank for International Settlements and the European Central Bank; and the national central banks such as the US Federal Reserve, the Bank of England, the Bank of Japan, etc.

Whenever you find it difficult to understand an action by a central bank, apply the principle in the previous paragraph and that action almost invariably makes complete sense. Everything else that central banks say and do is window dressing, secondary at best to their prime directive. Central banks were founded to protect the interests of the large banks, to keep the game of those banks going, and that is what they do.

And what is that game? Being able to create money from thin air and charge for the privilege.

So are central bankers, people like Ben Bernanke, liars? Or have they drunk the Kool Aid so deeply that they believe their own nonsense? The evidence points to the idea that both are true.

This topic is covered in great detail by many on the web, so I won’t recap it here. Please e-mail if you would like more detailed information on this.

Lie #12: Your paper/electronic currency is a reliable store of value.

For most people in the industrialized world, money means two things: a little bit of physical cash on hand, and more money than that in one or more accounts with financial institutions. This reflects the reports on world money supply: maybe as much as 1% of money is actual physical bills and coins, the rest is stored electronically.

This has a big implication, one not readily recognized by most. Every electronic representation of money is a promise by someone to pay up if that money is requested for possession or use. In other words, that money is owed to you. While you may consider it to be cash in your account, it is actually a debt, owed by the bank or money market fund, to you.

Everyone knows that, in the 19th Century, for example, money was backed by gold or silver. You could go to a bank and convert national paper currency for gold or silver coins. Because this restricted the ability of countries to wage war, that right was persistently eroded starting with world War I until it was abolished entirely in 1971.

So what backs up the money now? It is the ability and willingness of those who owe you money to pay up on demand. And the confidence of all who use the currency that they can exchange that currency for goods and services of real value.

Ability and willingness to pay: If the party who owes you money goes belly up or is unwilling to pay you, you are out of luck. That money you thought you had? Well, you don’t have it. In the case of complete bankruptcy, the money no longer exists, it went to money heaven. In the case of a bank, there is a government guarantee that, up to a certain amount, even if the bank goes under, the government will make good up to that guaranteed amount. Such guarantees were put in place in the 1930s after million lost their money due to bank failures.

Confidence: Everyone has heard of situations where people lost confidence in a national currency. The poster child is the Weimer Republic in Germany, with it infamous photos of people carting around wheelbarrows full of currency. And there have been such losses of confidence in Brazil, Argentina, Turkey, Zimbabwe, Viet Nam, and many others. In these cases, governments printed so much currency that it became a “hot potato,” where people wanted to exchange currency for something real as soon as possible because the currency was known to be losing value by the hour.

People can also lose confidence in a currency when a government is known to be going under, perhaps because they are losing a war.

People say that such fiat money, that is, money by the command of a government, is a medium of exchange and a store of value. It certainly is a medium of exchange for goods and services. Until it isn’t. And it isn’t when people lose all confidence in that fiat money as a store of value. Then it becomes that “hot potato.”

And it is somewhat surprising that people still regard it as a store of value. Since the inception of the US Federal Reserve in 1913, the US Dollar has lost, by the US government’s own statistics, 95% to 99% of its value, depending on what method is used for that calculation. People think that a loss of value over that much time is meaningless to them, allowing them to think, for example, that they were real estate geniuses for owning a house in the USA from 1971 to 1997, during which time that real estate “went up so much” in value. Most of that apparent gain was from currency debasement. People hear stories of how their great grandparents paid five cents for a loaf of bread and think that price increases for bread over time are normal. They are not! When money was backed by metals, prices for goods often stayed stable over many decades, with price fluctuations reflecting real changes in supply and demand in the economy, not politician-supplied increases in the supply of fiat currency.

Why have people come to accept increases in the money supply as necessary, and price inflation of 2% to 3% per year as normal, even as “low inflation”? Because it is key to the functioning of a financial regime where money is debt. When all money is debt, the borrower typically has to pay interest to the lender. On most of the money out there, namely that 99% of it that is stored in electronic accounts, people want some payback, interest payments, on their deposits. So let’s just say that, on average, 3% interest is due on all of the money out there. So every borrower, think banks as an example, who are borrowing from you because you have deposited money with them, has to come up with at least 3% more money every year to keep paying interest owed. So what happens if the economy doesn’t grow by at least 3% and there isn’t an increase of the money supply by 3%? It means that some borrowers will not be able to pay the interest they owe. And some of them will go bankrupt. Meaning that the money deposited with them might go to money heaven, disappear, subtracting a lot of money from the system. And this is a system where the amount of money in circulation must grow by that 3% every year or the system starts to go in reverse: instead of the supply of money growing, it starts contracting because of bankruptcies.

So now, do you see why those who run the financial regime go into a complete panic when the economy doesn’t grow? Why they start printing more money every time the economy and, thus the supply of money, shrinks? This is a crucial concept. An economy based on money that is debt must grow. Always. Infinitely. This is why politicians and central bankers repeat the word growth like a mantra. But ultimately, economies are based, at least for now, on finite resources. So how can they grow to infinity? This is the fatal flaw in a system where money equals debt: it must always grow. Which means it must always, as our economies are currently configured, consume more physical resources, especially fossil fuel energy. A steady-state economy is not acceptable when money is debt. It must grow and gobble up more of the resources of the planet. Forever. Which of course is impossible, at least until alchemy is a common skill. But the politicians like to ignore this and just keep chanting growth, growth, growth.

And all things economic obey the Law of Cycles. Things are created, they flourish, and then they pass away, making room for the new. To retain their power, the entrenched elite are trying to subvert that law.

WHY ARE THINGS THIS WAY?

Simply, for the guaranteed profit of a few at the expense of the many. This too is a topic for another day, but that’s the accurate and brief description that fits the facts.

WHAT THEN MUST WE DO?

We could go on and on about other fatal flaws of this financial regime that threaten its existence. The coming disruption from the US Dollar’s loss of reserve currency status. The unfairness of bailing out and supporting the banksters who are engaged, by any human standard, in blatant criminal activity. The subversion of the rule of law as government and its agencies are purchased by the banksters. About the accounting lies that allow financial feces to be counted on corporate balance sheets as shining light.

And you may not agree that the chickens will come home to roost on all twelve lies above. But recall that the financial regime almost fell from the demise of just one of its minor lies, the lie that real estate always goes up in value. Other lies above are for more fundamental to the regime, much more foundational in nature.

And it is because of the foundational nature of the lies that reform of the current system is impossible. Tweaking the rules will not address fundamental flaws.

So what then must we do? We will address that topic in our next article.

Many thanks.
Thundering Heard

Recommended: War Pigs – The Fall of a Global Empire

The is the first post in a series called “War is a Racket.”

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In the first post on Thundering-Heard.com, we promised to talk about several cycles that are coming to a close in support of the major transition in progress. Jim Quinn of the website The Burning Platform is a leading proponent of one of the shorter of those cycles, one that lasts four generations, or approximately 80 years. This cycle was fully described in the book The Fourth Turning by Strauss and Howe.

For this Memorial Day holiday in the USA, Jim has posted a great article on the USA’s dedication to war:

WAR PIGS – THE FALL OF A GLOBAL EMPIRE

The full article is highly recommended, but for those who don’t have time for that, here are some quotes from that article:

As Americans mindlessly celebrate another Memorial Day with cookouts, beer and burgers, the U.S. war machine keeps churning. As we brutally enforce our will on foreign countries, we create more people that hate us. They don’t hate us for our freedom. They hate us because we have invaded and occupied their countries. They hate us because we kill innocent people with predator drones. They hate us for our hypocrisy regarding democracy and freedom…

Any doubt that the Military Industrial Complex is as strong as ever should be removed after examining Obama’s 2012 Budget which has $900 billion dedicated to our military machine. We spent $370 billion in 2001, $620 billion in 2006, and now this liberal anti-war Democrat from Illinois is spending 45% more than that war monger Bush…

The Soviet Union collapsed in 1989, leaving the United States as the only remaining superpower on earth. Since 1990, the United States has depleted the U.S. Treasury of $11.5 trillion for spending on War. With no military on earth capable of challenging us why would there be a need to spend this much on the military? Over this same time frame the U.S. spent $500 billion on science, space & technology and $70 billion on energy, a mere 6% of the spending on invading sovereign countries. Military expenditures benefit humanity in no way. If these trillions had been invested by the private sector or devoted to energy and scientific research, our economy might not be a hollowed out shell, dependent on China for financing and oil exporting countries for energy. Neo-Cons argue the Arms Industry employs millions and benefits the country. These companies employ brilliant engineers and scientists who spend their days developing weapons that kill people more efficiently. If they had been employed manufacturing high tech goods to export around the world, inventing new technologies that didn’t obliterate human beings, newer safer nuclear power plants, a more efficient electric grid, upgrading our deteriorating infrastructure, or finding a cure for Alzheimer’s, would the United States be better off today?

“Preventive war was an invention of Hitler. Frankly, I would not even listen to anyone seriously that came and talked about such a thing.” –Dwight D. Eisenhower

“Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired, signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed.”  – Dwight D. Eisenhower

“My first wish is to see this plague of mankind, war, banished from the earth.” – George Washington

There was a tremendous surge in suicides by soldiers who have been pushed beyond their limits as they increased by 80% between 2004 and 2008. There are almost as many deaths by suicide as deaths in combat…

Peacemakers are ridiculed and shunned in America today. Those who preach diplomacy and non-interventionism … are scorned and ignored. Old men who care more about their own power than the human race are willing to sacrifice the blood of young people for precious oil, phony nationalism, their own strategic interests or corporate interests disguised as philosophical agendas. The world is a game for these old men. They care about their personal legacy and rigid ideologies. War and militarism are a failure of passion over reason. Albert Einstein, whose discovery brought about this age of potential world destruction, had no love for these blind warriors:

“He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt. He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would suffice.”

The financial system is based on twelve promises that are lies, Part 1

At base, the world has a true financial system consisting of people producing goods and services with real value and trading those among themselves. But grafted onto that reality is an intentionally complex and confusing mega-structure built from a series of promises that are lies. As these promises are increasingly understood as lies, this mega-structure is proceeding inevitably down a path to disintegration. The primary purposes of this article are:

1. To provide you with a checklist so you can understand where we are in this process of financial system disintegration. There is a caveat in terms of using this as a serial checklist proceeding over time: more than one of these lies may get generally recognized in a single event, with understanding rapidly communicated to the entire world.

2. To forearm those who wish to prepare with an understanding of what is unfolding. This is a predictable process, but it may feel quite chaotic to the unprepared. With understanding, and with echoes from the words of the immortal Rudyard Kipling, you will be able to keep your head (and your heart!) when all about you may be losing theirs.

3. To encourage people to take simple steps to sidestep the consequences of the widespread recognition of these lies. It is important to understand that general recognition of just one of these foundational lies–the lie that real estate prices always go up–came within hours, in October 2008, of vaporizing almost all of what are considered to be assets in this financial regime. Evasive action needs to be taken before these lies are generally understood. It is better to do your run on the bank before everyone else decides that’s a good idea. Those who prepare will be able to provide some assistance to those who have not.

4. To allow readers to proceed from understanding, not from the fear that leads to panic, and not from the fear that leads to denial or to throwing up one’s hands and pretending there is nothing to be done about all this. We hope this article provides such understanding.

In terms of tracking this process, we have already seen one prominent lie from this system bite the dust:

Lie #1: Real estate always goes up.

The perpetrators of this lie trotted out pithy sayings about population always increasing and “they aren’t making any more land” to somehow prove that real estate prices always go up. People can’t be blamed for this erroneous belief. Many saw real estate prices rising for their entire lifetime. But if one takes a larger historical look, it is obvious that real estate prices obey the Law of Cycles. They rise and fall just like most prices. This cyclical behavior of prices would not have been a problem for most people except so many of them fell for the idea that they should buy one or more properties with borrowed money, with a mortgage. So when prices fell, the amount owed on the mortgage has turned out to be greater than the current value of the house. Which is a nasty problem because, if a person wants to sell such a house, the current sale price is less than what they owe, so they have to pay money to sell their house, money which many don’t have. So they lose their house in a short sale or foreclosure.

For those who now have the urge to bet that real estate prices have fallen enough, the evidence says it’s a bad bet if you are thinking you will get price appreciation. If you are buying with cash to navigate through tough times, that is, you are buying a place where you can grow your own food, produce your own electricity, pump your own pure water, cut wood to heat your house? Good idea, depending, of course, on price and location. But buying or holding real estate thinking that the price will rise? Bad idea. There’s lots of evidence that any miniature “bottom” in prices will be short-lived and that prices will fall for a generation. The main reason? Real estate prices are still floating on a sea of debt. Most governments are still propping up otherwise-dead mortgage markets with government loans and guarantees that only a fool, excuse me, a government, would make. In other words, these are uneconomic loans that no sane person would make, and these insane loans are still propping up real estate prices in a big way. It won’t last.

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The remaining lies are in various states of disarray, but all still play key roles in the mindset that keeps the system intact.

Lie #2: It’s best to use Other People’s Money.

The farther in time we progressed following the 1930’s—the last time there were worldwide losses of homes, farms, and business to foreclosure, the last time governments defaulted on their bonds en masse, the last time there were huge numbers of bank failures—the more people were convinced that saving up money in order to buy something was for morons, and that buying things now, on credit, was the smart thing to do. The big deal became just how much borrowing one could “qualify for.” (This disease still persists for some, which is why, despite all of the pain it has inflicted, Lie #2 has not been relegated to the past in this article.) Paying it back was simple: money was worth less and less over time, everyone knew that; salaries always rose; the price of houses, the main collateral for loans, those always went up.

The result of this mindset is that so many people and organizations and even countries have become debt slaves to the bankers. To quote an anti-debt crusader in
Ireland: “Bankers want you to use your energy and your work to make their dreams come true.” Too bad more people didn’t know that before getting themselves so far into debt that it dominates their life.

Lie #3: We can buy cheap goods from countries that have cheap labor, and yet keep our much-higher salaries and benefits.

We’ve all heard for decades about how manufacturing, and in more recent years services, are moving from the developed world to the emerging markets. People in developed countries love to buy cheap goods from lands with ultra-low labor costs. But they expect their own salaries and benefits to remain the same or even increase. How can that be when the sources of income–that is, the jobs and profits and the tax base–that support that salary and benefits structure have moved to another part of the planet? This divergence between expected lifestyles and the labor required to support those lifestyles is bringing exponentially increasing strain to the developed countries. People and governments have tried to maintain their lifestyle illusions by borrowing more money than they can ever repay. They have used this borrowed money to try to bridge the gap between falling real income levels and their habitual spending. Much of the borrowed funds are coming from the countries currently doing all the work to produce those cheap goods. The signs that this attempt is coming apart at the seams are everywhere for those who choose to look.

Lie #4: Government pension and medical programs will deliver on their promises.

Many currently depend on government pension, medical insurance, and disability programs. Many more consider them an essential ingredient in their upcoming retirement plans. But as discussed in Lie #3, the tax base that supports these programs is rapidly eroding, and their funding assumptions were based on far shorter lifespans, lower medical costs, and flawed demographics in terms of the shrinking number of people paying into the system versus the growing number receiving benefits. And governments forcing interest rates to near zero in lame attempts to boost their economies means that pension fund assets earn far less in interest payments than expected. (This is a serious problem for private pension plans as well, most of whom still claim they can earn 8% on their assets a year on average, something very few are able to consistently accomplish. Without that level of earnings, they will not be able to meet their commitments.) If the liabilities of governments were calculated the way they are for businesses, the governments would be promptly declared bankrupt and hauled into court, where evidence of fraud would be a dominant topic.

Governments have four options regarding this slow motion train wreck:

  1. cut promised benefits;
  2. radically increase tax revenue;
  3. borrow even more money;
  4. print new money. (In the typical fashion of these times, they came up with a new name for this counterfeiting process of printing new money, they call it “quantitative easing.”)

Because the last two options on that list are the most politically palatable and the least painful to current voters, these are the options strongly preferred by politicians. They believe that telling the truth about this situation and taking responsible measures to put these programs on a sound footing would get them promptly kicked out of office, which is likely correct. So they take the borrowing and printing route because the pain from these is hidden from most people, and most of the pain is dumped on people’s children and grandchildren. Oddly, for all the noise people make about wanting to leave great things to their children, most people don’t care a whit about passing this huge government borrowing burden onto the children and grandchildren about whom they claim to care so much.

The problem with the borrowing and printing regime is that markets and people are increasingly catching on that: the borrowings are too large to be repaid; and the printing debases the money people have saved and earn, driving up the prices of necessities. Countries such as Greece, to whom the markets will no longer lend money and which cannot independently print money because of membership in the Eurozone, have already cut retiree pensions by two-thirds, and there are more cuts to come.

And while federal government programs have so far garnered most of the attention in terms of their unsustainability, most state, province, and city pension and insurance programs are no better off, and many are worse off, and they generally don’t have the option to print money. In the US, the Pew Research Center and others have estimated that state and local pension programs are underfunded by more than a trillion dollars. Yes, a trillion dollars is one of those numbers that is too large to comprehend. But the takeaway for anyone depending on these programs is that you will not receive the benefits you expect. And yes, when the bankers need a bailout or the governments want to fight yet another war, then it’s deficits be damned, they can easily come up with a trillion dollars. But when it comes to helping regular people, then it’s: “Sorry, we’d love to help you, but we can’t afford it, we have these deficits, you know, so we can’t help you.”

Lie #5: Your money is in the bank

The banking cartel loves to make you feel like they are rock solid and that the money you deposit with them is “in the bank,” safe and sound. As most actually do know, it isn’t. Or rather, only a small portion of it is actually “in the bank.” The rest, generally 90% to 95% of it or more, gets loaned out. (Or is used by the bank for speculative trading.) The bank pays you, at best, a paltry amount of interest on your deposit, and utilizes your money for something that pays them at a higher rate, and thus makes money from your money. And in many countries, governments assure us that banks are a truly rock solid place for your money by saying that, if the bank really messes things up and loses your money, the government guarantees that you will get it back.

This works quite well—until it doesn’t. This model of banking, the “fractional reserve” system, where only a fraction of the deposits are kept on hand, depends on the idea that not all depositors will want their cash at the same time, so most of the deposits can be loaned out. This is fine until a group of depositors needs that money, or they get frightened that perhaps the bank won’t have their deposit available for them when they want it, and they start a “run on the bank.” We’ve all seen pictures of what that looks like. Some of them show a well-behaved line of people waiting to get their funds. Other pictures show an angry, unruly mob clustered at the front door, perhaps bashing some bank windows. And if the bank has loaned out 95% or more of their deposits, it doesn’t take a large group of depositors to drain all the cash from the bank.

When this happens at a single bank, no problem. The government steps in with its guarantees and depositors are made whole up to the level of what the government guarantees. But in the Fall of 2008, we saw the start of a run on the banking system. Seeing the collapse of some banks and hearing rumors of many more, some people and corporations worried that the entire banking system was going kaput (it was!), and they started withdrawing all they could from the system. So governments quickly stepped in with far larger guarantee programs than had ever existed before, covering types of deposits, such as those in money market funds, that had never been guaranteed before. It was made clear that money would be printed to cover deposits, and so depositors calmed down and stopped their run on the system.

So the problem was solved, for the time being, by governments guaranteeing that the failure of private, commercial, corporate banks would not hurt their depositors. But now, those who astutely foresaw that the 2007-2009 phase of the crisis was coming, and warned about it loudly and clearly before it happened, see that people are rightly suspicious of government guarantees because it is becoming obvious that governments are broke. And who wants to rely on a guarantee from a bankrupt entity! More on this topic below at Lie #8.

The real problem for the banks is that they own what are called toxic assets. When the banks were perceived to be failing, it was because people knew that what the banks were counting as “capital” was losing value hand over fist and that, in fact, many banks, especially the big ones, actually had no capital left at all. Because of the political power of the big banks, governments attempted to solve this problem in three ways:

1) They let financial institutions lie about the value of their assets. They came up with accounting tricks that enable a bank to say that a loan portfolio is worth 100% of what they paid for it even if the collateral backing the loans, for example houses or shopping malls, is now worth far less than 100%. People call this the “extend and pretend” model. It is not a real solution, but it temporarily covers up the problem.
2) They buy toxic assets from the banks at full value and transfer the toxicity to the government. For example, the US Federal Reserve purchased $1.2 trillion worth of mortgage backed securities to take the losses away from the banks and to put taxpayers on the hook for the loss. People call this the “privatization of profits and the socialization of losses” model.
3) They lend them scads of short term cash to keep them afloat. Most banks in Spain would now be closed without the accounting lies from point 1 above and from hundreds of billions of euros worth of short term loans of newly-printed money from the ECB, the European Central Bank.

And in Greece and Spain, for example, some depositors are wising up. Billions of euros of deposits are being drained from Greek and Spanish banks each month, making bank solvency an even more distant hope with each passing month.

Lie #6: Your money is in your brokerage account.

Most people used to think–many still do–that brokerage accounts were safe from the fractional reserve threat to bank accounts, that is, they believed that brokerages did not lend out their money the way banks do, that their deposits to brokerage accounts just sat there waiting for deployment or withdrawal. Ha! Now that we are all wising up, how could we have thought that Wall Streeters could keep their grubby hands off that large pool of money. What the brokerages do is called the hypothecation of these assets, that is, they loan them out for a profit. And the entity, and I use that word intentionally, to whom they loan these assets often re-hypothecates them, that is, they loan those assets to yet another entity. It turns out that the City of London, an entity that operates quite independently of UK law in several respects, is the world playground of re-hypothecation, where the same asset can be re-lent several times. Have you wondered why it’s been so difficult for regulators to determine where the client money is in the recent failure of Jon Corzine’s MF Global brokerage? Look no further than the world of re-hypothecation, in which it can be difficult for anyone to know “where the money is” at any point in time.

So this is another part of the system where everything works well until it doesn’t. If people, intelligently I might add, start withdrawing significant amounts of money from the brokerage industry, they will find that it is yet another fractional reserve environment. So, is your money in your brokerage account really there? Maybe. Remember all that fine print they sent you when you opened your account that you didn’t read? Maybe that part about your account being a “Sweep Account”? Are the Wall Streeters sweeping your money for their profit?

Lie #7: It is OK for financial institutions to use huge leverage.

The Powers That Be/Were who run the financial regime think it is OK for central banks, commercial and investment banks, brokerages, and hedge funds to operate using massive leverage, in other words, massive borrowed funding. The system allows the likes of the Goldman Sachs, Bank of America, and Deutsche Bank to borrow tremendous amounts of money. In normal times, these big banks are considered reliable borrowers; when times are difficult, they are presumed to be backstopped by their governments.

The huge banks routinely operate at 20 to1 to 50 to 1 leverage. 50:1 leverage means that, for every $2 of reliable capital they have, they can operate in the marketplace as if they have $100. So a 2.5% loss wipes them out, makes them insolvent. In world markets operating at ever-increasing speeds, how can any participant always avoid a 2% loss? They can’t. Thus the financial system goes from crisis to crisis. As long as such large-scale leverage persists, the next bubble, and therefore the next crisis, will never be far off. Big leverage was at the base of every major crisis of the modern financial era: the Crash of 1987, the LTCM debacle of 1998, the tech stock crash of 2000, and the real estate bubble.

So why is this allowed to persist? Because these influential institutions can make a lot of money using leverage when times are good. Money they can use to influence the political and regulatory process. And when times are bad? Their losses are taken over by the taxpayers. Heads they win; tails we lose.

And consider what happened, and continues to happen, in the real estate market, when a buyer only has to come up with a 2% down payment. That means they are operating at a leverage ratio of 50:1. This has worked out very poorly for buyers and lenders. Yet in the USA, the government agency known as the FHA still guarantees hundreds of billions of dollars worth of real estate loans each year where the buyer only needs to come up with 3.5% as a down payment.

Lie #8: The government guarantees it.

Governments love to guarantee things. It makes people feel good, thus helping to secure votes, and typically it costs nothing up front. It’s a politician’s dream. So governments guarantee all kinds of things: bank deposits, mortgages, private pensions, student loans, loans to build what no sane person would build such as nuclear power plants, the bonds for infrastructure projects, loans made by a zillion government agencies, zombie banks (ones that would be promptly out of business if they weren’t being propped up by the government), companies considered too important to be allowed to fail, export-import loans, mortgage-backed securities…the list is long. And we have seen it expand promptly when an emergency hits.

But now people are questioning these guarantees. Iceland actually allowed citizens to vote on some of their government guarantees when the payments actually came due…and the people promptly threw those guarantees out. Guarantees in Ireland are on very thin ice. Very few trust government guarantees in Greece. Portugal, Spain, and Italy are likely next on the docket. In the past, very few people calculated these guarantees as part of government debt because they assumed that a guarantee was sufficient, that because of the guarantee, no money would ever have to actually be paid out. Now some of these guarantees are taking a big bite from government budgets. In the US, billions are being paid quarterly from government coffers into mortgage monsters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to cover losses on guaranteed mortgages.

Note that the public questioning of guarantees is mostly now happening in Europe because the individual countries in question do not have the authority to print new Euros. But the fact is that finances in Japan, the US, and the UK are worse than those in some European countries, but because these countries can print money at will, which they are also doing in volume, people still “trust” their guarantees. It is worth considering whether such trust is well-placed when printing trillions is required to keep the guarantees intact. People and markets will ultimately decide that it is not. It is best to stay ahead of this curve and to understand whether your bank, your pension fund, or any institution on which you rely is on a sustainable path. If it is not, make other plans as well as you can. And take action soon.

Let’s take a break! In tomorrow’s Part 2, we will cover these lies:

Lie #9: Government bonds are safe.

Lie #10: Derivatives reduce risk in the system

Lie #11: Central banks protect the interests of their country and its citizens

Lie #12: Your paper/electronic currency is a reliable store of value.

Many thanks.
Thundering Heard

Toward Clarity in this Time of Major Transition

People do not fall asleep at the time of a raid.
–Rumi, Mathnawi, Book V, 4099

This site is dedicated to those who are bringing light to the many places where unwelcome darkness still plagues humanity. It is dedicated to the architects of a new world.

Humanity and Earth are in a major transition in which we are undergoing transformative and accelerating change. This brings some chaos as old structures collapse, but also the opportunity to rebuild. The time is now.

Understanding the Old Patterns

We hold this truth to be self-evident: that it is not necessary that this planet have war, enslavement of many by the few, debilitating poverty, environmental devastation, counterfeit money, counterfeit food, counterfeit media, counterfeit governance steeped in secrecy and cronyism, and counterfeit religions paying lip service to love while fostering divisiveness and intolerance. Only a very small number of people want life on this planet to be arranged this way. They dominate far too many aspects of life.

We consider it to be crucial to this transition that humanity understands the current dominant structures, how and why they are as they are. Some advise that if we are seeking a world of higher vibration that we forget about the old negatives and focus only on the new, only on the positive. The Powers That Be would like nothing better. They would love to be allowed to continue their dominations. Gandhi successfully countered the British Empire, weakening it. Martin Luther King successfully countered racism, weakening its grip. If they had kept silent, would the world be a better place? Unlikely. The negative must be countered with truth, or it will continue to plague us. If Goldman Sachs, the CIA, JP Morgan, royal families, and the US Federal Reserve are allowed to continue their dominations, we will not get to a new age.

And there is much of great beauty and value in our current world. Our job is to understand what no longer serves humanity and to relegate it to the past, and to encourage that which supports people’s freedom to pursue their deepest, highest aims.

Why Now?

Why will effort for such far-reaching change succeed now when it has been so crushed in the past?

1. Truth is moving at nearly the speed of thought across the internet, penetrating formerly secret and dark corners. And people respond to truth, which is why the entrenched elite want so badly to squelch the world wide web. New channels of communication are helping to raise consciousness planet-wide, and as we all know from our inner life, increasing awareness precipitates change.

2. This transition is not limited to things human. It reverberates through our entire energetic continuum: the Earth itself is having documented increases in earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, changing weather patterns, and extreme weather events; energy is dancing from the Sun as we’ve never seen before; even the Earth’s magnetic poles are on the move in accelerating fashion.

3. End-of-cycle behavior is widely visible. One can see the desperate attempts at self-preservation of institutions that are runaway trains with little track left. One can read of the current bout of mass extinctions that can accompany the close of a major cycle. We will discuss several cycles that are coming to a close.

This time of transition is the opportunity many of us thought would never arise, but it is here now! The old ways are crumbling. It is visible all around us.

Boldness is Required

Our society is dominated by the few because the many allow them to do so. But their numbers are very small. Without our participation in their schemes, their power would vanish. It is time for us to consciously refuse their dominations.

It is time to radiate the depth and breadth of your being into this plane. We are talking about transforming most aspects of life on this planet, so your unique experience set, your particular skills are required, or you wouldn’t be here now. Your work will not be for naught. Let’s get up on our horses! If not now, when? And when you get up on your horse, hopefully we can keep up, and watch your ride in amazement.

Thundering-Heard.com

Since we are talking about nothing less than the emergence of a new world, this site will deal with a wide range of topics. The whole point is to attain clarity about what is happening and what is coming. Standing in that clarity, we can meet major change with equanimity, good cheer, and generosity, all the while envisioning a world of freedom and enlightenment.

Please consider what we publish as food for thought. Please comment below any post if you have questions, something to add, or if you think we got something wrong, which we sometimes undoubtedly will. We will happily provide clarifications. What we will not do is engage in long arguments, a very poor use of time and energy. We will make our case. Perhaps you will find it useful, or interesting, or funny. We hope you enrich our view with thoughtful statements of your own.

Thundering-Heard.com welcomes and will consider guest posts for publication, either under your name or under the overall name of this site.

Thank you very much for your attention.

Bumblingly yours,
Thundering Heard